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Lazy Join - 6 pairs

The diagrams below leaves out the bobbins, because the number is starting to become unwieldy. Instead each pair of threads is a different colour. These are a complicated form of a lazy join, so remember each pair stays together, in the same order, and the 2 bobbins move together as if they were a single thread.

This type of join is used in English Midland lace.

There are (at least) two methods of doing this. Both of the methods on this page mean that the pairs travel through the join and end up together on the other side. But they go different ways!

Method 1:

How to do a join of 6 pairs

Repeat Step

Description: This is not possible to describe using the cross/twist system, since twelve bobbins are involved.

Working: The red and blue inner pairs travel to the outside through the outer two couples of bobbin pairs (green/turquoise and pink/purple). These 4 pairs (now inner) cross in a 4 pair lazy join. The red and blue pairs travel back to their original position.

This is used in Bedfordshire lace to join three plaits or tallies.

It looks as if the red/blue couple of pairs will pull apart, but they are in one plait or tally before and after the join, and this pulls them together tightly, which tightens the whole join.

join of 6 pairs
This is a cross-over of three tallies. See pattern 81.




Method 2:

How to do a join of 6 pairs

Repeat Step

Description: This is not possible to describe using the cross/twist system, since twelve bobbins are involved.

Working: The six pairs start in three lots, probably coming from a plait or a tally. We will call these A, B and C. The inner pair of A and C work across the other pairs to end up on the other side. (Since this includes them crossing each other, this has to be done in a particular order - see diagram.).
Put in the pin.
Now work the original outer pair of A and C across the pairs in the same way. (Again, since they cross each other, this has to be done in a particular order - see diagram.)
This is quite complicated, so step through the diagram above to see what crosses what, when!

Another method:

A different technique can be used to join 6 pairs, or even more - click here.