Main index --- Minerals list --- Feldspar index Labradorite
Name:Labradorite
Derivation:From Labrador in Canada, where it was first found
Formula: NaAlSi3O8 - CaAli2Si2O8
Description: Dull dark grey rock, which flashes peacock blue or green when turned at the right angle to the light.

These two photographs show the same specimen at different angles, showing a glint of green, above, and blue, on the right. Feldspars can show interesting optical effects, but Labradorite is the most splendid. The colours are a reflection of the light, broken up to cause the colour. The most dramatic colours come from the polished specimens (which this is). However, a rough piece of labradorite can show small glints of colour as you turn it, as small pieces of the stone reflect light at the right angle. Labradorite

Larger pictures of Labradorite:

This specimen is polished. If you tilt it to the right angle against the light, vivid flashes of peacock blue appear in different places. The third photo shows what the specimen look like normally.

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Labradorite

This polished specimen shows lines of vivid green instead. The second photo shows the same specimen.

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This specimen is not polished. It is far harder to get the flashes, but you can just see a few dots of blue at the bottom.

Labradorite